October 11th, 2011

How to Store Potatoes

I need to store my potato harvest and I keep reading 45 degrees and dry. My basement has a dirt floor, thus making it not really what I would call dry. Underneath the front porch is a closed-off space but I’m afraid the potatoes will freeze there. Any other ideas?

blog-dougThe University of Idaho Potato Storage Research Facility recommends a cool temperature of 45°F and 95 percent relative humidity for potato storage. Unless your basement is so humid that condensation is running down the walls, it is probably your best choice. Potatoes can be kept at temperatures between 35°F and 60°F—but at the colder end of that range, starch in the tubers will convert to sugar, resulting in dark, discolored flesh when the potatoes are cooked. At the higher end of the range, the quality of the stored potatoes diminishes more rapidly and the tubers will be quicker to sprout.

When harvesting and handling your potato crop, protect them from bruises and cuts. It’s okay to give potatoes a quick rinse to remove soil, but don’t scrub them, because any scrapes or breaks in the skin—even microscopic ones—can allow disease pathogens to enter, leading to decay. Allow the potatoes to “cure” for a week after harvest at about 60 degrees before moving them to the cooler storage temperature; this gives the skins a chance to toughen up, helping them to resist shriveling and decay.

Finally, store the tubers in single layers on lath shelves or mesh nursery flats so air can circulate around them. The storage area should be completely dark to avoid the formation of solanine, a toxic alkaloid produced when potatoes turn green. Check on your potatoes regularly and remove any that are going soft.  —Doug Hall

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Comments

    Doug:
    After I cut the tops off the plants and let the skins thicken in-ground, I pull my potatoes up by hand and let them dry on my porch, dirt and all – absolutely no washing. I’ve found that the extra handling and the water rinse can affect the quality of the skin, therefore the storage, especially if you have a thin skinned potato. Once they’re dry I simply put them in an old school potato bin I bought at an auction and store them in my garage. We eat them well into winter.

    I can get the 45 degree temps but I’m in AZ there is not such thing as 95% humidity…..should I put them in the refrigerator in the garage?

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