July 28th, 2008

Garden Update

LeslieHWhat do we do in Texas when it’s 104 degrees? Well, try and keep the garden from gasping its last breath…and pickle peppers! While most spring planted tomatoes have long-since stopped setting fruit, there are a few veggies that kick into gear in the heat, peppers being the most prolific.
1I pickled a slew of beautiful Habaneros this past weekend.  My second
summer plantings of squashes are coming along nicely and I need to
harvest a bunch of eggplant. I’ll cut back those eggplant now and look
for a fall harvest from them. Okra is still coming along just fine as
well as certain variet
ies of Basil. ‘Sweet Aussie’ and ‘Pesto Perpetuo’ are two varieties
with small leaves and a compact dense growth habit. Neither variety is
ever in a hurry to flower even in the hottest part of summer. Made a
nice batch of fresh pesto from these plants.

I’ll be dropping my second planting of tomatoes in the ground this weekend for a fall crop. Also just seeded some black-eyed peas into the garden. Threw some radish seeds in with them, just to try and get an in-between crop. It’s a bit hot to try with the radishes, but they are such a fast crop that often you can still get nice results when it’s hot. Seeds of broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts are in the germination trays as we speak. Here in North Texas you can start seeds for cool season and cole crops now for transplanting into the garden in September. Two or three successions can be planted about two weeks apart. I’ll keep you posted.

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As for my ornamental garden this time of year? Well, it’s pretty much on it’s own…survival of the fittest I’m afraid! August in Texas is like a chemical peel for your garden. The Texas sun basically just blasts everything to you know where and then you get to start all over! Round two (or three really), here we come…I can’t wait until September…

Comments

    The dog days of summer have arrived and I seem to spend much of my garden time watering and pulling weeds. Chores that are necessary but when it is over 95 degrees and humid it takes some getting use to.

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