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October 28th, 2011

TGI Fall

by Alex Norelli—

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Over the past year of garden work I’ve realized something about gardening, It’s a lot of work! Even without the groundhogs picnicking on my tomatoes, the weeds as ambitious as the rain’s abundance, and most recently a deer breaking an entire limb off a young peach tree—even without those setbacks (i.e. the reality of gardening)— gardening is a lot of work.

So much so that I’ve been enjoying too little of the successes: the plentiful cayennes, the building of a fern garden, and the successful conversion of weedy plots into perennials. Once I realized that I was Gardening Too Much(!), I purposely took time to sit down and just look at what was around me—and use the other senses that are usually put on hold in order to muster the strength to haul another load of compost, or dig a hole for a tree. I can do all that later, I told myself, and I am glad I did.

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AH, IT IS FALL

I wish I could show you how the wind makes the oats move, silk quietly—then rattles high above an open ear, in the crinkly yellowish tone of rustling dryness.

I wish there were some way to encapsul the lime tips of sunny viridian, and the brush of gold pulsation warming my cheek between racing purses of rain.

I wish you knew water far off, traveling to you on an aquatic—undisturbed channel—arriving to you unscathed, over a meadow too damp to interfere.

And I wish I could show you: the numerable tongues at home in their mouths, this world, close, inaudible, yet warm as the core of you.

And I wish you could have been there, at the instant of recognition when the leaves, so golden, appeared to be clouds.

And the branches leading up to them, so slender and dark, appeared tethers of smothered embers: charcoal holding another season at bay.


ARtist, poet, Gardener www.AlexNorelliARt.com

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October 27th, 2011

How to get your kids to (happily) eat Brussels sprouts

mgtaylor60by Marygrace Taylor—
When it comes to foods on the Kids Won’t Touch list, Brussels sprouts are right up there at the top, along with other dinner table enemies like broccoli and spinach (or really, anything green). And really, who could blame a kid whose stomach starts churning at the mere thought of Brussels sprouts? Usually, they’re served up overcooked, soggy, and bitter—and with that unmistakable, sulfurous stench. But there’s an easy way to turn these miniature cabbages into a side dish or snack that even the staunchest sprout-phobes will love. Roasting Brussels sprouts brings out their natural sweetness and popcorn-like aroma while giving the outer leaves a satisfying crispness. Adding some chopped nuts and a bit of grated cheese makes them even more delectable. Your child might even ask for a second helping!

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Nutty Popcorn Sprouts

Active time: 10 minutes

Total time: 35 minutes

Ingredients
• 1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• Salt
• 2 tablespoons chopped hazelnuts, toasted
• 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 400°.

2. Place the halved Brussels sprouts on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle on the oil and add salt to taste. Toss well with your hands and spread the Brussels sprouts on a single layer, so none are on top of each other. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts are beginning to turn golden brown.

3. Place the roasted Brussels sprouts on a serving platter and top with the chopped hazelnuts and Parmesan cheese. Serve hot.

Serves 4

Per serving: Calories 185, fat 14 g, protein 8 g, carbohydrates 12 g, dietary fiber 5 g


Marygrace Taylor is the staff writer and recipe developer for KIWI Magazine. She lives and cooks in Austin, Texas, with her husband and dog, Charlie.

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October 27th, 2011

Fish Soup, Part II

Mario-peace-corps-blog-80by Mario Machado
Yesterday I wrote about a fish soup served by my Paraguayan host family, and today I’ll continue on that theme. Disclaimer: This meal is not for the weak of heart. When the meal begins, the situation resembles more or less a familial version of culinary anarchy. Utensils lurch forward, every man for himself, grasping at chunks of fish and mouthfuls of broth. Each bite brings the inevitable crunch of bones, which must then be “fished” out of one’s mouth and tossed to the ground. The family dogs dodge expertly between legs and under the table; for animals that don’t get fed often, fish soup is the best meal of the week.

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Inevitably, when the level of broth has dropped disproportionately to the level of piled fillets, family members reach for full sides of the fish and eat them by hand. My host father then does something that will never cease to amaze me. Somewhere in the mix and mash of fish anatomy, he locates the first fish head. Removing it from the bowl with his favorite ladle (which he prefers over a small spoon on fish soup nights), he begins to literally suck the face off of the underlying fish facial bone. Nothing is spared—lips, brains, eyes—everything is sucked dry in less than a minute. When he is finished, a stark white fish skull is left resting in his hand. The dogs never flock to my host father—he doesn’t waste a thing, not a single slice of flesh. He tosses the skull, the ultimate trophy of his fishing and consumptive prowess, and continues the wildness that is fish soup. Viva Paraguay.

I have tried eating a fish face and I must say, it is much more difficult than it looks. One must carefully navigate the small bone structure and strip away small pieces of flesh from around the eyes and mouth. When it comes to internals such as brains, sucking usually works best. As for lips, they are easy to figure out, for one only need give the fish a light kiss and breathe deeply and the entire front of the face slides right off the bone. The eyes, oh the eyes, I have never quite been able to get my head around—it might take a little more time to work up to those. From what I hear, the eyes are quite salty and taste wonderful with a slice of Paraguayan cheese. I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

Fish soup represents the best of Paraguay. Although they live in one of the poorest countries in South America (in front of only Bolivia), Paraguayans have risen to the occasion and created a culture that embraces challenges and remains perpetually tranquilo. The nation itself has gone through drastic changes throughout history—losing 90 percent of its male population in the Triple Alliance war, suffering under 30 years of the Stroessner dictatorship, and, currently, finding its way with a fledgling and often faltering democracy—but this has not dampened the Paraguayan spirit. Despite everything, fish soup brings families together to eat and laugh after long days of work and following brief games of soccer, played in haste before the sun sets over the palm trees. No matter what the future might have in store for this beautiful country, there will always be fish soup and everything else uniquely Paraguayan on which to rely.

Feeling well fed today,

Mario


Mario Machado is currently studying in Asunción, Paraguay, prior to serving for two years as an agricultural educator with the Peace Corps. The Allentown, Pennsylvania, native and 2011 Penn State graduate spent the summer of 2011 volunteering at the Rodale Institute and the Organic Gardening test garden.

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October 26th, 2011

Fish Soup, Part I

Mario-peace-corps-blog-80by Mario Machado
When you don’t have a lot, you eat what you do have and waste nothing; rural Paraguay is no exception to this fundamental rule. In a country dominated by widespread poverty and weak infrastructure, the food culture represents a symptom of—as well as an antidote to—difficult economic conditions. Starches are cheap and abundant, meat is of low quality but high on everyone’s wish list, and vegetables and fruits (while fresh and abundant) are expensive and seasonal. Chicken, low-grade beef, and several types of game (including rabbit and birds) are all consumed often and in variable quantities, with the rare treat of a slaughtered family pig thrown into the mix. Mandioc, a fibrous starchy root plant, is incredibly cheap and immensely resilient as a crop. It therefore finds its way onto every lunch or dinner table; the one thing that there is no shortage of in Paraguay is mandioc.

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For my host family, living at or below the poverty line has meant that food must be adaptable, with recipes that can tolerate a number of substitute ingredients and do not rely on too many spices (as many are expensive and difficult to come by). Still, the food is delicious and extremely rich, with plenty of natural flavors and often an excess of salt. We must count ourselves lucky to at least be able to say that we never go hungry and that there is always something on the table; not all in Paraguay or in many places in the world can say as much. My host father, a wise and good-natured farmer, has taken to fishing as both a beloved pastime as well as a great way to supplement protein in the family’s diet. Twice a week, he clambers onto a small-engine motorcycle with his brother and drives several hours along “paved” roads with fishing gear in hand. On these days, he wakes at 3 a.m. in order to catch a few in the Rio Pirana and return home in time for dinner with the family.

This is where it gets interesting. There are several main ways that Paraguayans eat fish: pescado milanese (lightly breaded and fried), pescado frito (pan-fried in oil), and the family favorite, sopa de pescado, or fish soup. Fish soup is less a meal and more an experience. My sisters spend all day slowly cooking a heavy broth with tomatoes and onions. Then the fish is added. The preparation of a fish for this meal involves gutting, scaling, and then cutting the entire carcass into four or five large pieces (head, tail and everything in between) before tossing it into the broth. This stews for around two hours while family members gather.

When the fish soup is ready, a table is brought out in front of the house; no chairs are placed around its perimeter. The entire cauldron of fish soup is then placed in the center of the table while eager family members select and wield their respective spoons. How the soup is consumed is a topic worthy of its own blog post; I’ll get to that tomorrow.

From the land of fish,

Mario


Mario Machado is currently studying in Asunción, Paraguay, prior to serving for two years as an agricultural educator with the Peace Corps. The Allentown, Pennsylvania, native and 2011 Penn State graduate spent the summer of 2011 volunteering at the Rodale Institute and the Organic Gardening test garden.

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October 15th, 2011

The Tulip Man’s Planting Tips

Keriann&Jeroen-100by Jeroen Koeman—
It’s a fact of life: For fabulous flowers that bloom in spring—such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and others—you must plant them in the fall. Bulbs require a “winter sleep” or cold period. Most tulips need at least 14-16 weeks of “cold period” to develop a big beautiful flower.

If you follow these simple tips you will have a beautiful spring garden:

1. Don’t plant too early
Plant when the soil temperature drops below 55˚F. If it’s 70-80 degrees outside it is too warm and the combination of warm temperatures and rain can cause those precious bulbs to rot. We live in central Virginia and don’t plant till early November.

2. Good drainage
As they say in Holland, bulbs don’t like wet feet.  Find a spot that drains well so your bulbs won’t drown.

3. Plant Deep
We recommend planting tulip bulbs 6-8” deep. This will encourage your tulips to come back, keep the soil temperature more consistent, and discourage squirrels from digging up a tasty organic snack! Planting later is also a good deterrent as they are less active and the cold will help mask that yummy bulb smell. Muscari and smaller bulbs like species tulips are planted 4” deep.

4. Compost
Adding compost to your soil is always good, as healthy soil equals healthy plants. We add a little compost to the bottom of the hole and mix it in with the soil.

5. Tip Up
Always plant your bulbs with the tip up or at least sideways, otherwise their root system will be facing the wrong direction and their chance of survival decreases. And we don’t want that.

6. Add Mulch:
Add a couple inches of mulch to insulate the soil, especially in colder climates. Leaves and straw are good choices.

An organic spring garden is easy and important for the bees as it provides an early and healthy food source.

Happy Planting!
The Tulip Man
Jeroen Koeman


Jeroen Koeman is the President & Co-Founder of EcoTulips—The only supplier of organic tulip bulbs in the US!

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